ENGLISH WORDS OF NO APPARENT GREEK ORIGIN (MEROS K)


(CONTINUED FROM  13/09/18)

Α)Ι ΝΟΣΤΡΙ ΔΙΑΛΕΤΤΙ ΣΟΝΟ ΙΝ ΣΚΡΙΤΤΙ ΚΙ ΟΥΖΑΝΟ ΛΕΤΤΕΡΙ ΔΙ ΑΛΦΑΒΕΤΙ  ΧΑΛΚΙΔΙΤΣΙ,   ΙΟΝΙΤΣΙ Ε ΚΙΡΙΛΙΤΣΙ

Β)DEN  PROSPATHOUME NA  APODEIKSOUME OTI TA PANTA PROERCHONTAI APO TOYS HELLEENAS ALLA NA TONISOUME,OTI SCHEDON OLA TA LEKSIKA STAMATOUN STEEN GALLIKEEN EE STEEN LATINIKEE LEKSIN KAI DEN ANAPHEROUN TEEN PRAGMATIKEE RIZA.

Γ)УИ  ДОНТ  ТРАИ ТО ПРУВ  ДАТ ЕВЕРИТИНГ  КОМЅ  ФРОМ ДЕ ГРИКС  БАТ УИ  ЕНТОНЕ  ДАТ АЛМОСТ ОЛ  ЛЕКСИКА-ДИКТИОНАРИЅ  СТОП ОН ФРАНЦ ОР  ЛАТИН УОРД ЕНД  АРЕН’Т  МЕНТИОНИНГ ДЕ РЕАЛ РУТ .

Etymology of kiss

The verb kiss comes from the old English cyssan, from the German kussen from the Greek kysso (Gr: κύσσω/κύσω; fut. of the verb kyneo, Gr: κυνέω: to kiss).

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Etymology of griffon, griffin

Griffon is a type of dog. The word griffon (also griffin or gryphon) comes from the old French grifon from the Latin gryphus / grypus, a transliteration of the Greek gryphon / gryps [Gr: γρύφων; lit. curved, hook-nosed], a legendary mythological creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle.

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) grypas: griffin, legendary creature [Gr: γρύπας]
b) grifon: griffon [Gr: γριφόν; loanword]
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Post 215. More

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Etymology of crypt

The word crypt (vault, cavern) comes from the Latin crypta (vault, cavern), from the Greek crypte, fem. of cryptos [hidden; Gr: κρυπτός], verbal adj. from cryptein [to hide, to conceal; Gr: κρύπτειν]. See also “etymology of grotesque” here.
.
From the same root:
cryptic, crypto-, cryptogam, cryptogram, cryptographer.
.

In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) crypte: crypt [Gr.: κρύπτη]
b) crypto (or cryvo): to hide, conceal, secrete [Gr.: κρύπτω or κρύβω].
c) cryptographos: cryptographer [Gr.: κρυπτογράφος]
d) cryptographima: cryptogram, coded message [Gr.: κρυπτογράφημα]
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Post 214. More

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Etymology of grotesque

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The adj. grotesque comes from the French crotesque from the Italian grottesco, (lit. “of a cave,”), from grotta, from the Latin crypta (vault, cavern), which is a transliteration of the Greek crypte [crypt, hidden place; Gr: κρύπτη]. Initially the phrase “figura grottesca” (or “pitture grottesche”) was referring to the paintings of the caves.
.
In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) grotesco: grotesque [Gr.: γκροτέσκο; loanword]
b) crypte: crypt [Gr.: κρύπτη]
c) crypto (or cryvo): to hide, conceal, secrete [Gr.: κρύβω]

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 Post 213. More.

Etymology of graffiti

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The wοrd graffiti comes from the Italian graffiti, plural of graffito (a scribbling), from graffiare (to scribble) from the Greek grafein (to write, to draw, to scratch; Gr: γράφειν].
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From the same root: -graphy (eg. geography), graphologist, graphic, praphics, graphite .
.
In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) grafo: (to write, to draw, to scratch, to type; Gr: γράφω].
b) grapsimo: handwriting [Gr: γράψιμο]
c) graphologos: graphologist [Gr: γραφολόγος]
d) engrafo: document, deed [Gr: έγγραφο]
e) graphica: graphics [Gr: γραφικά]
f) graphites: graphite [Gr: γραφίτης]

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Post 212.   More.

Etymology of gas

The word gas is simply a phonetic transcription of the Greek word chaos [Gr: χάος]. It was first used in the early 17th century by the chemist J.B. Van Helmont.
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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) haos: chaos [Gr: χάος].
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Post 211.  More.

Etymology of aria

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word aria comes from the Italian aria, from the Latin aerem, accusative of aer (air), which is a transliteration of the Greek aer [air; Gr: αήρ]. See also etymolology of air here.
.
In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):
a) Aria: aria [Gr: άρια]

 Post 210. More.

Etymology of carrot

Posted by Johannes on 16 April 2012

The word carrot comes from the old French carrotte, from the Latin carota, which is a transliteration of the Greek caroton (carrot; Gr: καρωτόν).

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In modern Greek (Romeika, Rumca):

a) caroto: carrot [Gr: καρώτο]

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From the same root: carotene, carotenoids

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(TO BE CONTINUED ) MARAPR12

Some sources

1. Lemon GW. English Etymology or, a Derivative Dictionary of the English Language: in two Alphabets. Robinson G eds. London M.DCC.LXXXIII.
2. Valpy F.E.J. Dictionary of the Latin Language. Longman and Co. London, 1828.
3. Κούβελας ΒΑ. Ετυμολογικό και Ερμηνευτικό Λεξικό της Λατινικής Γλώσσας. Μακεδονικές Εκδ. Αθήνα, 2002, [ISBN 960-319-224-4].
4. Online Etymology Dictionary [ http://www.etymonline.com/ ]
5. Σταματάκος Ι. Λεξικόν της Αρχαίας Ελληνικής Γλώσσης. Εκδ. Δεδεμάδη. Αθήνα, 2006.
6. Τζιροπούλου-Ευσταθίου Α. Έλλην Λόγος. Εκδ Γεωργιάδης. Αθήνα, 2003, [ISBN 960-316-190-Χ].

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About sooteris kyritsis

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