THE BLACK INTERNET or DARKNET (D)


(BEING CONTINUED FROM  17/08/18)

HiddenWall – Create Hidden Kernel Modules

HiddenWall is a Linux kernel module generator used to create hidden kernel modules to protect your server from attackers. It supports custom rules with netfilter (block ports, hidden mode, rootkit functions etc).

HiddenWall - Create Hidden Kernel Modules

The motivation is basically another layer of protection, much like a hidden firewall – setting securelevel to 2 on BSD would have a similar effect.

In a typical attack, the bad actor can alter your IPTables or UFW rules – with HiddenWall you still have another layer that can block external access because it hooks directly into netfilter from kernel land.

The author created it to protect his own servers but realised it also helps people who can’t write low-level code roll their own customized, hidden kernel modules.

If you can write low-level code, you can always add more module templates to HiddenWall.

Installing HiddenWall to Create Hidden Kernel Modules

Verify if the kernel version is 3.x, 4.x or 5.x:

1uname -r

Clone the repository

1git clone https://github.com/CoolerVoid/HiddenWall

Enter the folder

1cd HiddenWall/module_generator

Edit your firewall rules in directory rules/server.yaml, the python scripts use that file to generate a new firewall module.

If you want to study the static code to generate, look the content at directory “templates”.

Then you would want to generate a kernel module following your YAML file of rules:

1$ python3 WallGen.py –template template/hiddenwall.c -r rules/server.yaml

Then install it with insmod.

You can download HiddenWall here:

HiddenWall03.zip

Or read more here.

Anteater – CI/CD Security Gate Check Framework

Anteater is a CI/CD Security Gate Check Framework to prevent the unwanted merging of nominated strings, filenames, binaries, deprecated functions, staging environment code/credentials etc.

It’s main function is to block content based on regular expressions.

Anything that can be specified with regular expression syntax, can be sniffed out by Anteater. You tell Anteater exactly what you don’t want to get merged, and anteater looks after the rest.

How Anteater CI/CD Security Gate Check Framework Works

If Anteater finds something, it exits with a non-zero code which in turn fails the build of your CI tool, with the idea that it would prevent a pull request merging. Any false positives are easily negated by using the same RegExp framework to cancel out the false match.

Entire projects may also be scanned also, using a recursive directory walk. With a few simple steps, it can be easily implemented into a CI/CD workflow with tooling such as Travis CI, CircleCI, Gitlab CI/CD and Jenkins.

Anteater also provides integrates with the Virus Total API, so any binaries, public IP addresses or URL’s found by Anteater, will be sent to the Virus Total API and a report will be returned. If any object is reported as malicious, it will fail the CI build job.

You can also set it to block all binaries or tamper with existing binaries (this includes PDFs, Images etc.) and you can whitelist desired binaries using a SHA256 checksum.

Using Anteater CI/CD Security Gate Checks

There is some excellent documentation for Anteater here:

Docs » Anteater – CI/CD Gate Check Framework

This includes how to get it working with CircleCI which is my personal choice for CI tooling.

In order to use the VirusTotal API, you will first require an API key. These are free to get and can be obtained by signing up to the service here.

Once you have your key, it needs to be set as an environment variable.

You can download Anteater here:

anteater-master.zip

Or read more here.

SOURCE  http://www.darknet.org.uk/

(TO BE CONTINUED)

About sooteris kyritsis

Job title: (f)PHELLOW OF SOPHIA Profession: RESEARCHER Company: ANTHROOPISMOS Favorite quote: "ITS TIME FOR KOSMOPOLITANS(=HELLINES) TO FLY IN SPACE." Interested in: Activity Partners, Friends Fashion: Classic Humor: Friendly Places lived: EN THE HIGHLANDS OF KOSMOS THROUGH THE DARKNESS OF AMENTHE
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