PARTICIPATORY THEA AND ROEE (4)


(BEING CONTINUED FROM  21/09/2017)

VIRTUE, RESPONSIBILITY, BENEFIT: 

THE ETHICAL VALUES OR LENSES PROPOSED BY IFACCA . 

• A virtue  – or ‘freedom’  – ethic focuses on issues of  freedom in art and culture; 

on freedom of  self ‐expression and the autonomy of  art. 

It views creativity and art as intrinsically valuable and therefore legitimate goals in themselves. 

• A responsibility  – or ‘rights’  – ethic relates to the cultural interests and identities of  communities and groups,

 working in the context of  cultural traditions, and the realization of  cultural rights.

 This involves accessibility, availability and provision, participation and inclusion.

 • A corollary  – or ‘benefit’  – ethic can see creativity as a tool, 

focusing attention on the application of  arts practice in complex social and economic contexts. 

It’s also applicable to industrial spheres for e.g. the protection of  intellectual property, 

contractual relations with employers and funders. 

o How might practice use these ethical lenses? 

o The positions indicated under each category are not mutually exclusive and a piece of  work might combine more than one. 

The corollary lens, for example,

 could combine with both the other two to look at the relationship between creative arts work and social or political intervention. 

o The lenses, with their underpinning in human rights,

 point up those issues of  ‘inclusion’ and ‘marginalization’ which PT continually addresses and critiques.

 What is the work aiming at in any particular context, what drives it? 

The value of  these lenses is derived from their relationship to the REF set out above,

 and to the Core Principles elaborated below.10

STAGE 3: CORE PRINCIPLES CHOICE, EQUALITY, RESPECT, SAFETY, COMPETENCE.

 13.1: INTRODUCTION. 

This stage, during which continual reference to the Radical Ethical Framework and Values stages will be made, 

is intended to narrow the focus onto a set of  working concepts which both connect with, 

and challenge, current ideas of  ‘good practice’ in the political and social spheres.

 The research workshop process revealed that the CorePrinciples are resonant with meanings that may be obfuscated by institutional over‐use of  these terms: exploration revealed that many meanings cluster around the words, and shift according to context, 

individual interpretation and institutional context. 11

 In terms of  the Radical Ethical Framework,

 these principles may emerge as a challenge to and a questioning of  legal and institutional concepts of  ‘good practice’ and of  research ethics. 

The principles were developed in the context of  work with complex and vulnerable groups for Oval House, 

London, by Stella Barnes, their Head of  Education and collaborator in this project. 

Under prevailing codes of  practice, notions of  safety, for example, 

tend to default to limiting or preventing physical risk, emotional risk, or touching, 

They are there to often to protect against legal action and facilitator incompetence,

 amongst other things. In arts and theatre practice, on the other hand, 

risk is an accepted element in group and individual development,

 both in personal and creative forms. 

Group work involving physical activity and touching is regarded as standard.

 However, what kind of  risk is being alluded to?

 Does it conflict with the statutory position on risk or not?

 Similarly, Respect may conventionally be seen as excluding Challenge,

 an element of  the Radical Ethical Framework, while Choice, 

in the context of  Participatory Theatre working situations,

 can be provoking and provocative for all involved, owing to imbalances in power relationships, 

and to agendas being set by commissioners rather than by artists or participants.

 Asking the questions Who,What etc (below)

 will help to clarify what’s needed and what the CorePrinciples might mean in a specific context: 

a group of  learning disabled people may require a different approach to a group of  railway workers, for example. 

Acceptance of  gender inequality in ‘vulnerable’ or ‘marginalized’ groups raises specific issues of  practice.

 Inherent in all group work are issues of  power: 

relations between facilitator and group are especially complex and change as process develops.

3.2: NOTES ON CORE PRINCIPLES: 

CHOICE, EQUALITY, RESPECT, SAFETY, COMPETENCE. 

With reference to the Radical Ethical Framework and Values, 

it is helpful to reflect on what competence actually is. Is it a state of  being or of  becoming? 

It is certainly a key to exercising useful  judgment. 

During research it emerged that becoming competent is an incremental process.

 At its centre is reflection and reflexivity: a new practitioner who reflects, questions, 

learns from mistakes and successes and moves on is developing competence.

 The skills and knowledge grow with practice and in combination constitute the means whereby practitioners develop their praxis.

 The following is a cluster of  capacities relating to Competence proposed after consultation

 COMPETENCE

 • As an artist, developing and consolidating knowledge of  theatre and its potential and how to work in and hold the theatre space.

 • Learning from and reflecting on experience, and developing honest useful knowledge and self ‐awareness of  own capacities and limits at any stage. 

• Learning especially from mistakes.

 • Working to develop personal skills in reflection and transmitting these to others.

 • Developing, valuing and understanding your range and repertoire of  strategies and working practices at each stage of  working life.

• Developing the ability to exercise  judgment in relation to work process by developing a systematic and imaginative approach to analyzing the work,

 its context and key factors.

 • Increasing ability to question and to take working decisions with flexibility and creativity. 

• Understanding the implicit contract between yourself  and those you are working with. 

• Acquiring knowledge of  Equalities, Health and Safety and other legislation and of  accepted good practice. 

• Working to gain analytical rigour and imaginative freedom. 

• Developing ethical skills in negotiating, planning and contracting with employers to support both the working situation and yourself  as a professional.

 Competence here is both an ethical principle (an incompetent practitioner in a complex situation is unacceptable),

 and a necessary bridge between theory, 

principles and practice.

3.3 THE CORE PRINCIPLES. 

Having considered Competence at some length, it is worth pointing to the ambiguities that might

surround the other Core Principles.

 Questioning of  the Core Principles is appropriate, not least because there are socially received notions about what they might mean, and these notions may have to be challenged;

 this is especially true in places where control and repression are practised, such as old people’s homes, prisons, and young offenders’ institutions. It is important to take into account the civic context in which the work might take place. 

For example, in 1960s and 1970s Brazil, the coup of  1964 and continuing opposition to state repression 

and violence generated Boal’s Theatre of  the Oppressed with its penetrating analysis of  power and oppression.12 

Recently, Professor James Thompson13 has written about the ethical questions raised during work in the Sri Lankan war zone.

 Both Theatre for Development work and local UK work with groups experiencing injustice or coming from sexist, 

lawless and oppressive regimes, can raise particular political and ethical issues. 

Judgment and skills are needed in these contexts, but trial and error are also part of  the process.

 The meaning of  Choice, for example, has to be carefully considered in a prison where choice is restricted: 

what role can theatre play in explicitly or implicitly confronting the issue? 

What happens when the practitioner’s perception of  ‘choice’ differs from that of  the authorities? 

How might the REF influence decisions? 

What role does Safety have, how does it affect notions of  Equality? 

In what way would the decisions change in, say, a community centre or a school?

(TO BE CONTINUED)

FRANCES RIFKIN  / 2010

NOTES

10 Stella Barnes 

11 See Introduction

12 See TaPRA presentation for Rustom Bharucha on ‘the civic’

13 Professor of Applied and Social Theatre, University of Manchester

Advertisements

About sooteris kyritsis

Job title: (f)PHELLOW OF SOPHIA Profession: RESEARCHER Company: ANTHROOPISMOS Favorite quote: "ITS TIME FOR KOSMOPOLITANS(=HELLINES) TO FLY IN SPACE." Interested in: Activity Partners, Friends Fashion: Classic Humor: Friendly Places lived: EN THE HIGHLANDS OF KOSMOS THROUGH THE DARKNESS OF AMENTHE
This entry was posted in θεα-τ-ρο=THEA-TER and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.