ENGLISH WORDS OF NO APPARENT GREEK ORIGIN (MEROS IH)


(CONTINUED FROM  1/08/16)
Α)Ι ΝΟΣΤΡΙ ΔΙΑΛΕΤΤΙ ΣΟΝΟ ΙΝ ΣΚΡΙΤΤΙ ΚΙ ΟΥΖΑΝΟ ΛΕΤΤΕΡΙ ΔΙ ΑΛΦΑΒΕΤΙ  ΧΑΛΚΙΔΙΤΣΙ,   ΙΟΝΙΤΣΙ Ε ΚΙΡΙΛΙΤΣΙ

Β)DEN  PROSPATHOUME NA  APODEIKSOUME OTI TA PANTA PROERCHONTAI APO TOYS HELLEENAS ALLA NA TONISOUME,OTI SCHEDON OLA TA LEKSIKA STAMATOUN STEEN GALLIKEEN EE STEEN LATINIKEE LEKSIN KAI DEN ANAPHEROUN TEEN PRAGMATIKEE RIZA.

Γ)УИ  ДОНТ  ТРАИ ТО ПРУВ  ДАТ ЕВЕРИТИНГ  КОМЅ  ФРОМ ДЕ ГРИКС  БАТ УИ  ЕНТОНЕ  ДАТ АЛМОСТ ОЛ  ЛЕКСИКА-ДИКТИОНАРИЅ  СТОП ОН ФРАНЦ ОР  ЛАТИН УОРД ЕНД  АРЕН’Т  МЕНТИОНИНГ ДЕ РЕАЛ РУТ .

Etymology of almanac

Origin of the word almanac
The word almanac comes from the old French almanach from the Spanish-Arabic al-manakh (calendar, almanac) from the arabic articleal- and the Greek meneacon/manacon [of a month, of a lunary circle, calendar of a month; Gr.: μηνιακόν / μηναίον] from the root  men/mene [moon, month; Gr.: μήν/μήνη].

In modern Greek (Romeika)

a) almanac: almanac [Gr: αλμανάκ]

b) menas: month [Gr: μήνας]

c) menieos: monthly, of the month [Gr: μηνιαίος]

______

Post: 183.

 

Etymology of anthem

Origin of the word anthem
The word anthem comes from the old English ontemn, antefn, “a composition (in prose or verse) sung antiphonally,” from the Latinantefana, a transliteration of the Greek antiphona “verse response”.

From the same root:
antiphon, phonetic etc

In modern Greek (Romeika)
a) antiphono: antiphon [Gr: αντίφωνο]
b) anti-: anti-[Gr: αντι-]
c) anti: instead of, in place of, as, for [Gr: αντί]
d) phone or better phoni: voice [Gr: φωνή]
____
Post 185.


http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=anthem

 

Origin of the word April

The word April comes from the old French Avril, from the Latin Aprilis (month of Venus, the second month of the ancient Roman calendar, dedicated to the goddess Venus) from Apru, a transliteration of the Greek Aphro from Aphrodite (Venus; Gr: Αφροδίτη).

In modern Greek (Romeika)
a) Aprilis: April [Gr: Απρίλης]

Post 184.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/April#Etymology

 

Etymology of typhoon

The word typhoon (violent storm, whirlwind, tornado), comes from the Greek typhon [whirlwind; Gr: τυφών], personified as a giant, father of the winds, perhaps from typhein “to smoke” (origin of the word typhus).

In modern Greek (Romeika):

a) typhonas: typhoon [Gr: τυφώνας]

_________________________ Post 192. More. _________________

 

Etymology of decade

 

Decade, “ten parts” (of anything), comes from the old French décade (14c.), from the Latin decadem (nom. decas), from the Greek decas(gen. dekados) “group of ten.” Meaning “period of ten years” is 1590s in English. See also “etymology of dean” here .

 

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) decada: ten parts [Gr: δεκάδα]
b) decaetia: ten years period, decade [Gr: δεκαετία]

____________________ Post 191. More. ________________________

 

Etymology of dime

 

The word dime (coin worth one tenth of a US dollar, a 10 cent coin) comes from the old French disme (a tenth part), from the Latin decima[tenth (part)], from decem (ten), from the Greek deca (ten). See also “etymology of dean” here .

 

______________________ Post 190. More. _______________________

Etymology of December

The word December comes from the Latin December (tenth month of the old Roman calendar, which began with March), from decem (ten), from the Greek deca [ten; Gr: δέκα]. See also “etymology of dean” here .

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) Decembrios (better pronounced as Dekemvrios): December [Gr: Δεκέμβριος]

______________________ Post 189 __________________________

 


Etymology of dean

 

Dean comes from the old French deien, from the Latin decanus “head of a group of 10 monks in a monastery”, from earlier secular meaning “commander of 10 soldiers” (which was extended to civil administrators in the late empire), a transliteration of the Greek decanos [Gr:δεκανός], from deca “ten”. College sense is from 1570s.

In modern Greek (Romeika):

a) deca: ten [Gr: δέκα]

b) deca-: deca- [Gr: δέκα-] (decathlon, decalogue etc.)

c) decaneas: corporal, leader of ten soldiers [Gr: δεκανέας]
_____________________ Post 188. More._______________________

 

Etymology of mandolin

Mandolin comes from the French mandoline, from the Italian mandolino, diminutive of mandola, a larger kind of mandolin, altered from the Latin pandura (a three-stringed lute), which is transliteration of the Greek pandura.


In modern Greek (Romeika):

a) mandolino: mandolin [Gr: μαντολίνο; loanword]
Post 187.
___
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=mandolin&searchmode=none

 

Etymology of banjo

 

Origin of the word banjo
The word banjo (a stringed instrument with four or five strings, usually associated with country music) comes from the Portoguese bandurra, from the Latin pandura, which is a transliteration of the Greek pandura (a three-string instrument; Gr: παντούρα).

From the same root:

mandolin, banjulele

___

In modern Greek (Romeika)

a) banjo: banjo [Gr: μπάντζο; loanword]

b) mandolino: mandolin [Gr: μαντολίνο; loanword]

c) mandura: a folk music instrument [Gr: μαντούρα]

Post 186.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=banjo&searchmode=none

(TO BE CONTINUED ) JUNJULAU11

Some sources

1. Lemon GW. English Etymology or, a Derivative Dictionary of the English Language: in two Alphabets. Robinson G eds. London M.DCC.LXXXIII.
2. Valpy F.E.J. Dictionary of the Latin Language. Longman and Co. London, 1828.
3. Κούβελας ΒΑ. Ετυμολογικό και Ερμηνευτικό Λεξικό της Λατινικής Γλώσσας. Μακεδονικές Εκδ. Αθήνα, 2002, [ISBN 960-319-224-4].
4. Online Etymology Dictionary [ http://www.etymonline.com/ ]
5. Σταματάκος Ι. Λεξικόν της Αρχαίας Ελληνικής Γλώσσης. Εκδ. Δεδεμάδη. Αθήνα, 2006.
6. Τζιροπούλου-Ευσταθίου Α. Έλλην Λόγος. Εκδ Γεωργιάδης. Αθήνα, 2003, [ISBN 960-316-190-Χ].

PAGAN  http://ewonago.wordpress.com/

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About sooteris kyritsis

Job title: (f)PHELLOW OF SOPHIA Profession: RESEARCHER Company: ANTHROOPISMOS Favorite quote: "ITS TIME FOR KOSMOPOLITANS(=HELLINES) TO FLY IN SPACE." Interested in: Activity Partners, Friends Fashion: Classic Humor: Friendly Places lived: EN THE HIGHLANDS OF KOSMOS THROUGH THE DARKNESS OF AMENTHE
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