ENGLISH WORDS OF NO APPARENT GREEK ORIGIN (MEROS IZ)


(CONTINUED FROM  17/11/15)
Α)Ι ΝΟΣΤΡΙ ΔΙΑΛΕΤΤΙ ΣΟΝΟ ΙΝ ΣΚΡΙΤΤΙ ΚΙ ΟΥΖΑΝΟ ΛΕΤΤΕΡΙ ΔΙ ΑΛΦΑΒΕΤΙ  ΧΑΛΚΙΔΙΤΣΙ,   ΙΟΝΙΤΣΙ Ε ΚΙΡΙΛΙΤΣΙ

Β)DEN  PROSPATHOUME NA  APODEIKSOUME OTI TA PANTA PROERCHONTAI APO TOYS HELLEENAS ALLA NA TONISOUME,OTI SCHEDON OLA TA LEKSIKA STAMATOUN STEEN GALLIKEEN EE STEEN LATINIKEE LEKSIN KAI DEN ANAPHEROUN TEEN PRAGMATIKEE RIZA.

Γ)УИ  ДОНТ  ТРАИ ТО ПРУВ  ДАТ ЕВЕРИТИНГ  КОМЅ  ФРОМ ДЕ ГРИКС  БАТ УИ  ЕНТОНЕ  ДАТ АЛМОСТ ОЛ  ЛЕКСИКА-ДИКТИОНАРИЅ  СТОП ОН ФРАНЦ ОР  ЛАТИН УОРД ЕНД  АРЕН’Т  МЕНТИОНИНГ ДЕ РЕАЛ РУТ .

 

 

Origin of the word cinema .

The word cinema comes from the French cinéma, shortened from cinématographe, coined 1890s by Lumiere brothers, who invented it, from the Greek cinema (movement; better pronounced as kinima; Gr: κίνημα), from the verb cino (to move; better pronounced as kino; Gr:κινώ).

From the same root

English: cinematography, cinerama, cinemascope, kinetics, kinematics, kineto

French: cinema, cinematographe,

Italian: cinematografo,

Spanish: cine, cinematica,

German: Kino, Kinematograph

In modern Greek (Romeika)

a) cinema: cinema [Gr: σινεμά

b) kinima: movement [Gr: κίνημα]

c) cinimatographos (better pronounced as kinimatographos): cinema [Gr:κινηματογράφος]

d) kino: to move [Gr:κινώ]

 

 

Origin of the word cite

The verb cite (to summon) comes from the Latin citare, from ciere, from cieo (to move, set in motion, stir, move), which is a transliteration of the Greek verb cieo/cineo (I move, stir, rouse, summon; Gr: κιέω/κιώ/κινέω).

From the same root:

English: cinema, excite, incite, citation, recite, recital .

French: citer, citateur, inciter, reciter .

Italian: citare, citatire, incitare, recitare .

Spanish: citar, cita, excitar .

German: zitieren, Zitat .

In modern Greek (Romeika): .

a) cino (better pronounced as kino): move [Gr: κινώ] .

b) cinisi (better pronounced as kinisi; remember the related word kinetics): movement [Gr: κίνηση] .

c) tsitato: citation, a part of a text with an important message [Gr: τσιτάτο; loanword] .

d) cinema: cinema [Gr: σινεμά; loanword] .

Post 176.

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________

 

Origin of the word albatross.
The word albatross comes from the Portuguese alcatraz (pelican) from the Arabic al-câdous or al-ġaţţās (a pelican), from the Greek word kados [jar; Gr: κάδος ] in reference to the pelican’s pouch. The spelling was influenced by the Latin albus (white).

In modern Greek (Romeika)
a) kados: jar [Gr: κάδος]
b) albatros: albatross [Gr: άλμπατρος; loanword].

albatross (n.)
1670s, probably from Spanish or Portuguese alcatraz “pelican” (16c.), perhaps derived from Arabic al-ghattas “sea eagle” [Barnhart]; or from Portuguesealcatruz “the bucket of a water wheel” [OED], from Arabic al-qadus “machine for drawing water, jar” (from Greek kados “jar”), in reference to the pelican’s pouch (compare Arabic saqqa “pelican,” literally “water carrier”). Either way, the spelling was influenced by Latin albus “white.” The name was extended, through some mistake, by English sailors to a larger sea-bird (order Tubinares).
Albatrosses were considered good luck by sailors; figurative sense of “burden” (1936) is from Coleridge’s “Rime of the Ancient Mariner” (1798) about the bad luck of a sailor who shoots an albatross and then is forced to wear its corpse as an indication that he, not the whole ship, offended against the bird. The prison-island of Alcatraz in San Francisco Bay is named for pelicans that roosted there.

 

 

Origin of the word anchovy.
The word anchovy comes from the Genoese anchova, from the Latin apua (small fish) from the Greek aphye [small fry; Gr.: αφύη].

In modern Greek (Romeika)
a) anchuyia: anchovy [Gr.: αντσούγια; loanword]

anchovy (n.)
1590s, from Portuguese anchova, from Genoese or Corsican dialect, perhaps ultimately from either Latin apua “small fish” (from Greek aphye “small fry”) [Gamillscheg, Diez], or from Basque anchu “dried fish,” from anchuva “dry” [Klein, citing Mahn].

 

ampoule (ampul, ampulla)

The word ampoule (small bottle or flask) comes from the Latin ampulla, a contracted form of amphora, which is a transliteration of the Greek amphorefs/amphora (vessel, flask, bottle; Gr: αμφορεύς)

In modern Greek (Romeika)

a) ampula: ampoule [Gr: αμπούλα; loanword]

b) amphoreas: amphora [Gr: αμφορέας]

 

ampoule (n.)
“small bottle or flask,” especially one used for holy liquids, c. 1200, from Old French ampole, from Latin ampulla “small globular flask or bottle,” which is of uncertain origin, perhaps a contracted form of amphora.
ampul (n.)
sealed container holding a dose of medicine, 1907, from French ampul (1886), from Latin ampulla (see ampoule). A modern borrowing of the word represented by Middle English ampoule.
ampulla (n.)
late 14c., type of globular ancient Roman vessel;

 

the word box

The word box (wooden container) comes from the Latin buxis/buxus, which is a transliteration of the Greek pyxis/pyxos [box (the tree); Gr.: πύξος].

In modern Greek (Romeika)

a) pyxida: compass [Gr: πυξίδα]

Post 179


 

columbarium, Columbus. Saint Columba.
A columbarium is a place for the respectful and usually public storage of cinerary urns, a vault with niches for urns containing the ashes of cremated bodies. The term comes from the Latin columba (dove, dovecote) and originally referred to compartmentalized housing for doves and pigeons. The word columba comes from the Greek word colymbis [wild ducks or wild birds that use to dive into the see water; Gr.:κολυμβίς] from the verb colymbo (to dive, duck; Gr.: κολυμπώ).

From the same root:
Columbus [From the Greek Colymbos (diver), Gr.: κόλυμβος], Columbia, Colombia etc.

In modern Greek (Romeika)

a) colymbo: swim, bath [Gr.: κολυμπώ ]

b) colymbi (or colymbisi): swimming [Gr.: κολύμπι or κολύμβηση]

c) colymbitirio: swimming-pool, lido [Gr.: κολυμβυτήριο]

d) colymbitis: swimmer [Gr.: κολυμβητής]

e) colymbithra: font [Gr.: κολυμβήθρα]

Post 178.

 

Saint Columba

Saint Columba was a sixth-century Orthodox Irish saint, who founded an important monastery on the Scottish island of Iona.


In the early centuries of Christianity the name Columba was popular, because the “dove” is a Cristian symbol for the Holy Spirit and peace.

 

(TO BE CONTINUED ) APRMAI11

Some sources

1. Lemon GW. English Etymology or, a Derivative Dictionary of the English Language: in two Alphabets. Robinson G eds. London M.DCC.LXXXIII.
2. Valpy F.E.J. Dictionary of the Latin Language. Longman and Co. London, 1828.
3. Κούβελας ΒΑ. Ετυμολογικό και Ερμηνευτικό Λεξικό της Λατινικής Γλώσσας. Μακεδονικές Εκδ. Αθήνα, 2002, [ISBN 960-319-224-4].
4. Online Etymology Dictionary [ http://www.etymonline.com/ ]
5. Σταματάκος Ι. Λεξικόν της Αρχαίας Ελληνικής Γλώσσης. Εκδ. Δεδεμάδη. Αθήνα, 2006.
6. Τζιροπούλου-Ευσταθίου Α. Έλλην Λόγος. Εκδ Γεωργιάδης. Αθήνα, 2003, [ISBN 960-316-190-Χ].

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