ENGLISH WORDS OF NO APPARENT GREEK ORIGIN (MEROS ICT)


(CONTINUED FROM  12/02/15)
Α)Ι ΝΟΣΤΡΙ ΔΙΑΛΕΤΤΙ ΣΟΝΟ ΙΝ ΣΚΡΙΤΤΙ ΚΙ ΟΥΖΑΝΟ ΛΕΤΤΕΡΙ ΔΙ ΑΛΦΑΒΕΤΙ  ΧΑΛΚΙΔΙΤΣΙ,   ΙΟΝΙΤΣΙ Ε ΚΙΡΙΛΙΤΣΙ

Β)DEN  PROSPATHOUME NA  APODEIKSOUME OTI TA PANTA PROERCHONTAI APO TOYS HELLEENAS ALLA NA TONISOUME,OTI SCHEDON OLA TA LEKSIKA STAMATOUN STEEN GALLIKEEN EE STEEN LATINIKEE LEKSIN KAI DEN ANAPHEROUN TEEN PRAGMATIKEE RIZA.

Γ)УИ  ДОНТ  ТРАИ ТО ПРУВ  ДАТ ЕВЕРИТИНГ  КОМЅ  ФРОМ ДЕ ГРИКС  БАТ УИ  ЕНТОНЕ  ДАТ АЛМОСТ ОЛ  ЛЕКСИКА-ДИКТИОНАРИЅ  СТОП ОН ФРАНЦ ОР  ЛАТИН УОРД ЕНД  АРЕН’Т  МЕНТИОНИНГ ДЕ РЕАЛ РУТ .

Origin of the word cheap
The word cheap comes from the old English ceap (n.; traffic, bargain, a purchase) from the Germanic ceapian (v.; trade) from the Latincaupo (gen. cauponis; petty tradesman, huckster), which derives from the Greek cape (stall for provisions, a small piece; Gr.: κάπη) andcapilos (synonym to caupo; vintner, huckster, petty tradesman; Gr: κάπηλος].

 

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) capilos: huckster, monger [Gr: κάπηλος]
b) capilio: wineshop, pothouse [Gr: καπηλειό]
c) capilia: exploitation, trading (on sth) [Gr: καπηλεία]

 

 

Origin of the word camomile

The word camomile comes from the French camomille from the Latin chamoemelon, which is a transliteration of the Greek chamaimelon[camomile, lit. earth-apple; Gr.: χαμαίμηλον] from chamai (on the ground; Gr: χαμαί) + melon (apple; Gr: μήλον). So called because of the apple-like scent of the plant.

 

In modern Greek :
a) hamοmili: camomile [Gr: χαμομήλι]
b) hamo: on the ground [Gr: χάμω]
c) milo: apple [Gr: μήλο]

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http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/camomile

Origin of the word wolf .
The word wolf is probably related to the Latιn lupus (wolf), which derives from the Greek lycos (wolf; Gr: λύκος).

In modern Greek (Romeika):

a) lycos: wolf [Gr: λύκος]

b) lycophilia: a spurious/sham friendship [lit.: friendship between wolfs (lycos+philia); Gr.: λυκοφιλία]

 


 

Can – word origin.

The word can (cup, vessel, container) comes from the old english canne (a cup, container) from the Germanic kanna, an early borrowing from late Latin canna (container, vessel), from the Latin canna (reed, reed pipe, small boat), from the Greek canna (reed; Gr.: κάννα).

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=can&searchmode=none

 

Canister – word origin.

Canister (basket, vessel for liquids, container) comes from the Latin canistrum (wicker basket for bread, fruit, flowers, etc.), which is a transliteration of the Greek canistron/canastron (basket made from reed) from canna (reed; Gr: κάννα).

In modern Greek (Romeika):

a) canistro or canistra: canister [Gr: κάνιστρο or κανίστρα]

 


http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=canister&searchmode=none

Origin of the word cannon
The word cannon comes from the old French canon, from the Italian cannone (large tube) from the Latin canna (reed, tube), which is a transliteration of the Greek canna (cane, reed; Gr: κάννα).

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) cannoni: cannon [Gr: καννόνι]

 

Origin of the word cinnamon

The word cinnamon comes from the old French cinnamone from the Latin cinnamomum/cinnamum (cinnamon) [also used as a term of endearment], which is a transliteration of the Greek cinnamomon (cinnamon; Gr.: κιννάμωμον).


 

Origin of the word chop (to cut)
Τhe word chop (to cut) comes from the old French coper (to cut, cut off), which, most probably, is derived from the Greek verb copto (to cut; Gr: κόπτω).

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) copto or covo: to cut [Gr.: κόπτω or κόβω]
b) copi: cutting [Gr.: κοπή]

Post 168

 

Origin of the word chop (shift quickly)
The word chop (shift quickly) comes from the old English ceapian (to bargain) from the Latin caupo from the Greek cape .

 

Origin of the word disaster

The word disaster comes from the Middle French désastre from the old Italian disastro, which  comes from the Greek pejorative prefixdis– (bad; Gr: δυσ-) + aster (star; Gr: ἀστήρ). So disaster lit. means “bad star”. The sense is astrological, of a calamity blamed on an unfavorable position of a planet.
In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) asteri or aster: star [Gr: αστέρι or αστήρ]

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disaster

 

Origin of the word chameleon
The word chameleon comes from the Latin chamaeleon, which is a transliteration of the Greek chamaileon from chamai (on the ground; Gr: χαμαί] + leon [lion; Gr: λέων].

 

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) hameleon: chameleon [Gr: χαμαιλέων]
b) hamo: on the ground [Gr: χάμω]
c) leon or liontari: lion [Gr: λέων or λιοντάρι]
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Origin of the word saliva.

The word saliva comes from the Latin saliva (spittle), from the Greek sialon (saliva, spittle; Gr: σίαλον).

 

In modern Greek (Romeika):

a) salio or sialos or sielos: saliva [Gr: σάλιο or σίαλος or σίελος]

b) sielogonos: salivary [Gr: σιελογόνος]

c) sielorrhea: salivation [Gr: σιελόρροια]

 

Post 175.


 

Origin of the word misery
The word misery comes from the French miserie from the Latin miseria (wretchedness) from miser (wretched), which is a transliteration of the Greek miseros/misaros (abominable, despicable, wretched; Gr: μυσαρός) from misos (evrything that cause abhorrence, repulsion, revulsion; Gr: μύσος).

From the same root:
English: miserable, miser, miserly
French: misere, miserable, miserieux, misericorde, miserere
Italian: miseria, misere, miserabile, misericordia, misserimo
Spanish: miseria, misero, miserable, misericordia, miserere

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) mizeria: misery [Gr: μιζέρια; loanword]
b) mizeros: miserable, wretched [Gr: μίζερος]

 

 

Origin of the word salary

Salary derives from the French salarie from the Latin salarium (salary, stipend, originally soldier’s allowance for the purchase of salt) fromsal (salt), which comes from the Greek als (salt; Gr: άλς).

From the same root: salt, salad, salami

 

In modern Greek (Romeika):

a) alas or alati: salt [Gr: άλας or αλάτι]

b) salata: salad [Gr: σαλάτα]

c) salami: salami [Gr: σαλάμι]


 

Word origin of the name Christ
Christ comes from the Greek word Christos (Gr: Χριστός), which means “the anointed one”. It was a translation of the Jewish word Messiah.

Jesus Christ, Saint Catherine’s Monastery, Mount Sinai.
From the same root:

Christmas, Christian, Christianity, Christology.

In modern Greek (Romeika):
a) Christos: Christ [Gr: Χριστός]
b) Christianos: Christian [Gr: Χριστιανός]
c) Christugenna: Christmas [Gr: Χριστούγεννα; lit. Christ’s birth]
d) Christologia: Christology [Gr: Χριστολογία]
e) Christianismos: Christianity [Gr: Χριστιανισμός]

Origin of the word austere

Austere comes from the Latin austerus (dry, harsh), which is a transliteration of the Greek austeros (bitter, harsh; Gr.: αυστηρός).

From the same root: austerity

In modern Greek (Romeika):

a) afsteros: austere [Gr: αυστηρός]

b) afsterotita: austerity [Gr.: αυστηρότητα]

 

Origin of the word pectoral

The word pectoral (pertaining to the breast), comes from the Latin pectoralis from pectus (breast, chest), fom the Greek pectos (compact, firm; Gr.: πηκτός)

 

 

(TO BE CONTINUED ) JENFEMAR11

Some sources

1. Lemon GW. English Etymology or, a Derivative Dictionary of the English Language: in two Alphabets. Robinson G eds. London M.DCC.LXXXIII.
2. Valpy F.E.J. Dictionary of the Latin Language. Longman and Co. London, 1828.
3. Κούβελας ΒΑ. Ετυμολογικό και Ερμηνευτικό Λεξικό της Λατινικής Γλώσσας. Μακεδονικές Εκδ. Αθήνα, 2002, [ISBN 960-319-224-4].
4. Online Etymology Dictionary [ http://www.etymonline.com/ ]
5. Σταματάκος Ι. Λεξικόν της Αρχαίας Ελληνικής Γλώσσης. Εκδ. Δεδεμάδη. Αθήνα, 2006.
6. Τζιροπούλου-Ευσταθίου Α. Έλλην Λόγος. Εκδ Γεωργιάδης. Αθήνα, 2003, [ISBN 960-316-190-Χ].

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